NPR Files Lawsuit for Veterans Against Iran for Funding Terrorism

May 15, 2017

 

NPR, along with attorneys from six other law firms across the nation, filed suit in Washington, D.C. against the Islamic Republic of Iran. The lawsuit, Holladay, et al. v. the Islamic Republic of Iran, Case No. 1:2017-cv-00915, was filed on behalf of 34 families who suffered death or injury at the hands of terrorists.

The plaintiffs were injured, directly or indirectly, in peacekeeping efforts during Operation Iraqi Freedom. The suit alleges that during those efforts, “Iran recruited, trained, and financed Iraqi terrorists, providing the most deadly IED’s used against US troops and paying bounties to terrorists who killed US civilians and soldiers.”

Iran has a long history of bankrolling terrorist acts and NPR is helping veterans and Gold Star families fight back. However, to finance attacks, Iran had help from foreign banks and even used U.S. dollars to complete their transactions.

In the litigation against Iran, NPR will be part of the trial team that researches the case, provides argument in federal court, and ultimately participates in the trial of the lawsuit.

Officials believe approximately 36,000 U.S. casualties during Operation Iraqi Freedom could be traced to Iranian-sponsored terrorists.

The U.S. designated Iran a “state sponsor of terror” in 1984. The designation came the year after a suicide bomber crashed a track filled with explosives into military barracks in Beirut, Lebanon, killing 241 U.S. military personnel.

The plaintiffs are represented by NPR partners Michael Angelovich and Neil Smith, and associates Chris Johnson and Chad Ihrig. A copy of the lawsuit filed against Iran can be viewed below:

Terrorism Lawsuit Against Iran
05/15/2017